Hubble captures look at galaxy duo in Hare constellation

The Hubble Space Telescope has identified a particular object in the constellation Hare consisting of two individual galaxies, which embody more than 1 million miles per hour.
According to NASA, they travel too fast to melt into a single galaxy, but are close enough to massively distort their structures.
Hubble saw the 500-million-light-year pair using its Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instruments.
Over the years, the NASA / ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured all sorts of strange galactic interactions, including ‘galactic cannibalism’, harassment and galactic galactic collisions, “according to NASA.
The IRAS 06076-2139 galaxies, seen in the constellation Lepus (the hare), are actually two objects, not just one.
Two galaxies that flow with each other in about 2 million kilometers (1,243 million km / h) appear as one of the great Hubble photo, since they are only 20 000 light-years.

According to NASA, galactic interactions can take many forms – and one day, even our own will be subject to a merger with another.
“The Milky Way is going to end up being a victim of a collision, merging with the Andromeda galaxy in about 4.5 billion years,” NASA said.
“The fate of our galaxy should not be alarming, however: while galaxies are home to billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so great that no stellar collisions occur.
Yesterday, researchers revealed a fascinating look at the Crab Nebula, using Hubble data.

This includes the Very Large Array (radio), Spitzer Space Telescope (infrared), Hubble Space Telescope (visible), XMM-Newton (Chandra ultraviolet and X-ray Observatory).
Individually, these consist of, respectively, violet red, yellow, green, blue and composite image.
“Comparing these new images taken at different wavelengths gives us new insights into the Crab Nebula,” said Gloria Dubner of the Institute of Astronomy and Physics.
Even though the crab is well studied for years, we still have much to learn about it.

After covering the images of five different telescopes, which represent almost the entire electromagnetic spectrum, astronomers have revealed the nebula again and astounding detail.
The remarkable object is the remains of a stellar explosion that lit the sky for almost 1,000 years, bright enough to be seen on Earth from 6500 light-years.
The researchers used the Very Large Array and Hubble Space Telescope data, and several others, to merge comments of different wavelengths in efforts to improve understanding of the complex internal mechanisms of the nebula.
In the new study, researchers from the Institute of Astronomy and Physics, National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET) and the University of Buenos Aires put in operation five telescopes to obtain a new view of the Crab Nebula.

The Hubble Space Telescope has identified a particular object in the constellation Hare consisting of two individual galaxies, which embody more than 1 million miles per hour.
According to NASA, they travel too fast to melt into a single galaxy, but are close enough to massively distort their structures.
Hubble saw the 500-million-light-year pair using its Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instruments.
Over the years, the NASA / ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured all sorts of strange galactic interactions, including ‘galactic cannibalism’, harassment and galactic galactic collisions, “according to NASA.
The IRAS 06076-2139 galaxies, seen in the constellation Lepus (the hare), are actually two objects, not just one.
Two galaxies that flow with each other in about 2 million kilometers (1,243 million km / h) appear as one of the great Hubble photo, since they are only 20 000 light-years.

According to NASA, galactic interactions can take many forms – and one day, even our own will be subject to a merger with another.
“The Milky Way is going to end up being a victim of a collision, merging with the Andromeda galaxy in about 4.5 billion years,” NASA said.
“The fate of our galaxy should not be alarming, however: while galaxies are home to billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so great that no stellar collisions occur.
Yesterday, researchers revealed a fascinating look at the Crab Nebula, using Hubble data.

This includes the Very Large Array (radio), Spitzer Space Telescope (infrared), Hubble Space Telescope (visible), XMM-Newton (Chandra ultraviolet and X-ray Observatory).
Individually, these consist of, respectively, violet red, yellow, green, blue and composite image.
“Comparing these new images taken at different wavelengths gives us new insights into the Crab Nebula,” said Gloria Dubner of the Institute of Astronomy and Physics.
Even though the crab is well studied for years, we still have much to learn about it.

After covering the images of five different telescopes, which represent almost the entire electromagnetic spectrum, astronomers have revealed the nebula again and astounding detail.
The remarkable object is the remains of a stellar explosion that lit the sky for almost 1,000 years, bright enough to be seen on Earth from 6500 light-years.
The researchers used the Very Large Array and Hubble Space Telescope data, and several others, to merge comments of different wavelengths in efforts to improve understanding of the complex internal mechanisms of the nebula.
In the new study, researchers from the Institute of Astronomy and Physics, National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET) and the University of Buenos Aires put in operation five telescopes to obtain a new view of the Crab Nebula.

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